Drayton's Gazette discusses social and political issues happening around the globe through the eyes of the African American, minority and disaffected communities.

Has the Governor of Wisconsin Sacrificed by V. Lyn

In Bahrain, Egypt, Libya, Iran, Jordan and Syria our government officials caution other leaders to use restraint as their citizens  demonstrate for a say in their lives, as they protest for democracy and yet the Governor of Wisconsin threatens to bring in the National Guard for American citizens and there is little OUTRAGE .  As the Governor plays hardball with the state workers in an attempt to bust the Unions  that gave all workers union and non union workers a 40 hour work week, workmen compensation, minimum wage and so many other rights that we exercise where we work. Demolishing the Unions serve another purpose for corporations and the Republican Party, unions are a major contributor to the democratic party getting voters particularly minorities both non and union members out to vote during elections, the Republican Governor of Wisconsin is willing to destroy the financial well being of the state employees as well as those who depend on the liquid cash those employees will no longer have to make purchases with. The Governor has demanded that those employees make sacrifices but has he sacrificed as he has asked the Citizens of Wisconsin to. The biggest issue is their right to negotiate collectively which is the strength of the union and without it the worker who may have a grievance  is basically a lamb to the slaughter.

Governor Scott Walkers salary  is $137,092.00 plus benefits which typically include the Governors Mansion, with paid utilities, a cleaning crew, pension, health care and a car. From Section B-4.00 of OSER (Office of State Employees of Wisconsin) So I wonder has Governor Walker donned the mantle of sacrifice and cut his salary, given back the free car and cut his cleaning staff?

                  

4.00 Benefit Provisions
4.01 Health Insurance Premiums

 

 

As provided under Chapter 40, Wis. Stats., and this Plan, the provisions for state
payment of health insurance premiums are identical to the provisions for

 

 

nonrepresented permanent classified employees. See Section A,
 

 

 

 

 

S.Ol

of this Plan.
 

 

 

 

 

                  

fit Provisions
4.01 Health Insurance Premiums

 

 

As provided under Chapter 40, Wis. Stats., and this Plan, the provisions for state
payment of health insurance premiums are identical to the provisions for

 

 

nonrepresented permanent classified employees. See Section A,
 
 

 

 

S.Ol

of this Plan.
 
 

 

 

                 

4.02 Retirement ·Contributions

(1) As provided under s. 40.0S(1)(b), Wis. Stats., and this plan, the state payment
for employee retirement contributions shall equalS.O% of the earnings for

 

creditable service of each participating employee.

(2) The State shall pay the 1.0% benefit adjustment contribution required by

s. 40.0S(2m), Wis. Stats., for participating employees whose formula rate is

determined under s. 40.23(2m)(e)1 and 3, Wis. Stats.

(3) Effective January 1, 1996, the State shall pay the additional three tenths of one

percent (0.3%) employee share of the benefit adjustment contribution for

general occupation participants required by s. 40.0S(2n)2, Wis. Stats.

 
 

 

 

(DCA)

Discretionary Compensation Adjustments (DCAs) shall be granted to

 

unclassified employees not serving a fixed term, under
 
 

 

3.0S

of this Section 
(Section B), in accordance with Section J of this Plan.
 

 

From OSER: Office of State Employees of Wisconsin indicates the salaries and compensations for elected officials including the Governors http://www.wisgov.state.wi.us/appointments.asp

Here is the 2009 Wisconsin briefs 09-4 for the Compensation of Wisconsin Legislature  http://legis.wisconsin.gov/lrb/pubs/wb/09wb4.pdf

From page 4 of the brief:

RETIREMENT AND OTHER BENEFITS

Under the state retirement plan, legislators may receive a full pension beginning at age 62, with actuarially reduced benefits available at age 55, and a preretirement death benefit available to beneficiaries. To receive benefits, a member cannot be holding any position at the time of retirement, whether elective or appointive, that is covered by the Wisconsin Retirement System (WRS). 1995 Wisconsin Act 302 established a requirement that there be a minimum period of at least 30 days after separation from state employment before the start of an annuity.
Legislators were first permitted to participate in the Wisconsin Retirement Fund on a voluntary basis in 1957. Members of the 1957 Legislature could receive credit for prior service if they joined the system within a 90-day enrollment period. Chapter 288, Laws of 1973, made membership compulsory for those serving after January 1, 1974.

 

WRS rules provide for both employer and the employee payroll contributions to the retirement fund. However, at the present time, the state pays both the employer’s and employee’s contributions for legislators and other state employees. This is also currently the common practice with local government employers.

In general, legislators are afforded the same benefits that are available to other state employees, including health insurance and sick leave. Legislators may also elect to receive life insurance and income continuation (disability) insurance. Some of the benefits are provided at no extra cost to the employee, but others require a payroll deduction.

 

To Contact the Governor of Wisconsin here is the web page where you can contact them http://www.wisgov.state.wi.us/appointments.asp

//
 
LRB−1383/2CMH/RAC/TJD:all:all
January 2011 Special Session2011 − 2012 LEGISLATURE
SENATE BILL 11
February 14, 2011 − Introduced by C
COMMITTEE
 
 
relating to:
state finances, collective bargaining for public employees,compensation and fringe benefits of public employees, the state civil servicesystem, the Medical Assistance program, sale of certain facilities, grantingbonding authority, and making an appropriation.
Analysis by the Legislative Reference Bureau
COLLECTIVE BARGAINING
Under current law, municipal employees have the right to collectively bargainover wages, hours, and conditions of employment under the Municipal EmploymentRelations Act (MERA), and state employees have the right to collectively bargainover wages, hours, and conditions of employment under the State EmploymentLabor Relations Act (SELRA).  This bill changes MERA and SELRA with respect toall employees except employees who are certain protective occupation participantsunder the Wisconsin Retirement System or under a county or city retirement system(public safety employees).  This bill limits the right to collectively bargain for allemployees who are not public safety employees (general employees) to the subject of base wages.  In addition, unless a referendum authorizes a greater increase, anygeneral employee who is part of a collective bargaining unit is limited to bargainingover a percentage of total base wages increase that is no greater than the percentagechange in the consumer price index.  This bill also prohibits municipal employersfrom collectively bargaining with municipal general employees in matters that arenot permitted under MERA.
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